Committed to preventing emotional trauma caused by parental alienation.
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Parental Alienation Awareness work to prevent alienation abuse and to affect systemic change to create fairer systems for families. 

How You Can Help
  1. Simply book your next holiday with Charitable Travel and tell us you want to support Parental Alienation Awareness. The charity will then benefit from the free donation you can make as part of the booking process. To read more about how this works, head to our ‘How We Do Good‘ page.
  2. If you want to make a donation to Parental Alienation Awareness and you are not booking a holiday, click here to visit their website.
  3. Visit paawareness.co.uk/ to sign up to newsletters, and follow the Parental Alienation Awareness social media pages, and help spread the word.
How You Can Help
How You Can Help
  1. Simply book your next holiday with Charitable Travel and tell us you want to support Parental Alienation Awareness. The charity will then benefit from the free donation you can make as part of the booking process. To read more about how this works, head to our ‘About Us‘ page.
  2. If you want to make a donation to Parental Alienation Awareness and you are not booking a holiday, click here to visit their website.
  3. Visit paawareness.co.uk/to sign up to newsletters, and follow the
    Parental Alienation Awareness social media pages, and help spread the word.
  1. Simply book your next holiday with Charitable Travel and tell us you want to support Parental Alienation Awareness. The charity will then benefit from the free donation you can make as part of the booking process. To read more about how this works, head to our ‘How We Do Good‘ page.
  2. If you want to make a donation to Parental Alienation Awareness and you are not booking a holiday, click here to visit their website.
  3. Visit paawareness.co.uk/ to sign up to newsletters, and follow the Parental Alienation Awareness social media pages, and help spread the word.

About Us

Parental Alienation Awareness is a charity founded in 2020 and its core aims are to raise awareness, educate and campaign against this form of abuse. They also promote a culture of equality in parental rights, reducing discrimination for parents and their families when accessing child related services and the family court system during divorce, separation and child contact disputes. Through their work, they seek to minimize the impact on children that are suffering this form of abuse. For more information on the charities work, please visit the Parental Alienation Awareness website.

What is Parental Alienation?

Parental alienation is defined as a condition, it usually occurs in divorce, separation and child contact issues. It is the destruction of a relationship between parent and child. The child or children ally themselves strongly with one parent (the preferred parent) and rejects the relationship with the other parent (the alienated parent) without legitimate justification.

It involves a set of coercive and controlling behaviours that lead to a child emotionally cutting off from a “good enough” parent who poses no safeguarding risk to them. It is a form of domestic abuse involving the psychological manipulation of a child into showing unwarranted fear, disrespect or hostility towards the targeted parent and/or their other family members.

200 children a day lose contact with a parent in family court. That is 1 in 3 children never seeing their alienated parent again after divorce and separation.

1 million grandparents in the UK are denied access to their grandchildren.

This process leads to a tragic outcome when the child and the alienated parent, who previously had a loving and mutually satisfying relationship, lose the nurture and joy of that relationship for many years and perhaps for their lifetimes.

This process leads to a tragic outcome when the child and the alienated parent, who previously had a loving and mutually satisfying relationship, lose the nurture and joy of that relationship for many years and perhaps for their lifetimes.

Individuals use alienating strategies, such as the ones in the video, to create conflict between a child and the parent who is targeted for alienation. These behaviours and intended conflict lead to the rejection of that parent. 

You can find out more information about Parental Alienation Awareness and all the ways you can get involved and help, here.

Get in touch

Location

Basepoint, Yeoford Way, Marsh Barton, Exeter, Devon EX2 8LB

Email: [email protected]

Charity and Company

Registered charity number 1187738. 

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