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Top Ten Picnic Spots in the UK

Thanks to the Government’s new lockdown regulation easing, we can now start having picnics in wonderful outdoor spaces all around the UK. We’ve lined up our favourite places to nibble on a scotch egg or two for your inspiration.

Barafundle Bay, Pembrokeshire

Aerial shot of Barafundle Bay in Pembrokeshire

Accessible only by a half mile walk from a nearby car park, this beautiful bay backed by sand dunes and pine trees has been voted one of the best beaches in Britain and in the world! More than just a beach, you can spend your time here exploring the sand dunes, taking a dip in the sea, or examine the rock pools and caves. Remember though, this beach is isolated, there are no facilities and whatever you take with you has to leave with you.

Dunstable Downs, Bedfordshire

Dunstable Downs, Bedfordshire

The highest point in the East of England, Dunstable Downs affords incredible views of Aylesbury and along the Children Ridge. Any adventurer, old, young, or in between will find something to entertain, wildlife to discover, wide open spaces for sports, plenty of lush scenery to take in, and a family-friendly visitor’s centre with information about the local archaeology.

Upper Wharfedale, Yorkshire Dales

Grass Woods, Near Upper Wharfedale, Yorkshire Dales

Wherever you chose to go in the Yorkshire Dales, you will be treated to scenes of beautiful rolling hills and valleys and lush greenery. Upper Wharfedale follows suit. Enjoy a peaceful walk through the charming valley, dotted with pools and falls, making it the ideal place for a spot of ‘wild swimming’ followed by an amazing riverside picnic. Head a little further north of the village of Grassington, towards Grass Wood, an ancient woodland carpeted with wildflowers. The perfect spot for an idyllic picnic.

Devil's Dyke, West Sussex

Devil's Dyke, West Sussex

Discover Britain’s deepest and widest dry valley whilst taking in amazing panoramas and colourful wildlife. The increased altitude gives you incredible views over the English Channel and the South Downs and is a perfect location for kite-flying and rolling down hills, as well as picnics. The ultimate picnic spot combining stunning vistas and a fun day out.

Castlerigg Stone Circle, Keswick

Castlerigg Stone Circle, Keswick

We could have filled this list with just places in the Lake District, as it seems that around every corner and along every country lane in this National Park there’s a gem, hidden or otherwise, begging to be picnicked in. We’ve chosen Castlerigg Stone Circle as for the list however, because we would never pass up the opportunity to munch on carrots and humous surrounded by an ancient stone circle. Named as one of Britain’s most impressive pre-historic sites, you’re also offered views of four of the tallest peaks in the Lake District.

Holkham Beach, Norfolk

Holkham Beach, Norfolk

With three miles of flat golden sands, you won’t have trouble finding a secluded spot for your private picnic on this beach, despite it being a popular place for locals and tourists alike. The beach is part of Holkham National Nature Reserve, and in the dunes hide natterjack toads and a variety of wildflowers, like lavender, thistles and orchids. To work up an appetite (or work off a feast) there’s a three-hour hike that sees the landscape change from creaking pinewoods to wild-life rich marshland, to one of the most beautiful beaches in Britain.

Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

Sitting pretty on the very edge of a cliff in the National Trust’s Downhill Estate, the Italianate Mussenden Temple offers one of the most beautiful coastal views in Northern Ireland. Part of and 18th Century estate, the temple was originally built as a summer library, and it is certainly a dramatic spot to sit back and enjoy a good book. We think you’d have a blast with a flask of tea and some sandwiches as well.

Wimpole Estate, Cambridgeshire

Wimpole Estate, Cambridgeshire

An impressive mansion and a working country estate, this National Trust property will one day allow visitors to explore the Georgian interiors, including the iconic Yellow Drawing room, but for now, only the grounds are open to the public. Take a slow stroll through the charming gardens and busy farmyard or go venture slightly further and you are rewarded with woodlands, lakes, and fields to choose from for your afternoon snack.

Marsden Bay, South Tyneside

Marsden Bay, South Tyneside

This charming bay acts as a suntrap and wind-shelter so is best visited on a sunny day. Here you can explore hidden caves and limestone cliffs or relax and watch the colonies of seabirds zooming overhead. Known locally for its colourful history with smugglers, the bay is a perfect spot for rock pooling for crabs or mussels, and stunning views of landmarks such as Marsden’s Rock and Camel Island.

Corfe Castle

Corfe Castle, Dorset

Corfe Castle ruins are one of Britain’s most iconic and evocative survivors of the English Civil War and sit proudly upon the hill of the beautiful historical village of the same name. with thousands of years of history to see, it’s no wonder Corfe Castle is a hit with grown-ups and kids alike. Visit the ruins and learn about the castle’s colourful and long history, or sit, enjoy the view and tuck in.

Book a staycation with Charitable Travel before 30 April 2021 and be in with a chance to win an annual family membership to the National Trust! Call us on 020 3092 1288 or email us today!

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