Four British Animals You Can Help

Every year in the UK over 5 million wild animals and birds are injured by encounters with humans. Here's how you can help four species.

Hedgehogs

These prickled creatures are at risk of extinction and populations have declined by 46% in the last 13 years due to habitat destruction and human hazards. To make your garden safe, don’t use slug pellets, keep barbed wire and netting secure, check bonfires before you light, compost heaps before you dig, and long grass before you cut. If you find an injured hedgehog, use gloves to pick it up and put it in a cardboard box lined with newspaper and a towel to hide under. If it’s cold, add a wrapped hot water bottle. Offer dog or cat food and water until you can find a rescue service. Encourage insects into your garden by adding native plants make a hedgehog highway between yours and your neighbours’ gardens.

Deer

Out of the six species of deer living wild in the UK, only the Red deer and the Roe deer are native. All species of deer hide their young alone in the grass for long periods of time whilst the mother goes away to feed, so never assume a fawn has been abandoned if you find it alone. Never approach or touch one, and move away if you come across one by accident. If your car hits a deer, keep your distance but watch to see where it goes and call your nearest wildlife hospital for advice. If you are already close, cover the deer’s head with a blanket ro reduce stress until an experience handler arrives.

Badgers

Badgers are seldom seen alive as they are nocturnal and very shy, but should only ever be handled by experienced wild animal handlers because they are strong, quick, and potentially dangerous animals with a nasty bite. Badgers and their setts are protected under law to stop humans interfering with them. You should keep a safe distance, downwind, wear dark colours and keep quiet if you wish to observe one. If you find an injured or trapped badger, call a wildlife rescue service immediately.

Foxes

The only British animal to have made a success of urban living, foxes are nevertheless at risk of injury from humans, commonly road accidents. Foxes should only be approached by experienced handlers as they can bite when cornered. Always observe from a distance before calling an animal rescue service. Foxes can contract sores and fur loss caused by skin mites. Those with advanced mange will need to be trapped and treated.

Four British Animals You Can Help

Every year in the UK over 5 million wild animals and birds are injured by encounters with humans. Here's how you can help four species.

Hedgehogs

These prickled creatures are at risk of extinction and populations have declined by 46% in the last 13 years due to habitat destruction and human hazards. To make your garden safe, don’t use slug pellets, keep barbed wire and netting secure, check bonfires before you light, compost heaps before you dig, and long grass before you cut. If you find an injured hedgehog, use gloves to pick it up and put it in a cardboard box lined with newspaper and a towel to hide under. If it’s cold, add a wrapped hot water bottle. Offer dog or cat food and water until you can find a rescue service. Encourage insects into your garden by adding native plants make a hedgehog highway between yours and your neighbours’ gardens.

Deer

Out of the six species of deer living wild in the UK, only the Red deer and the Roe deer are native. All species of deer hide their young alone in the grass for long periods of time whilst the mother goes away to feed, so never assume a fawn has been abandoned if you find it alone. Never approach or touch one, and move away if you come across one by accident. If your car hits a deer, keep your distance but watch to see where it goes and call your nearest wildlife hospital for advice. If you are already close, cover the deer’s head with a blanket ro reduce stress until an experience handler arrives.

Badgers

Badgers are seldom seen alive as they are nocturnal and very shy, but should only ever be handled by experienced wild animal handlers because they are strong, quick, and potentially dangerous animals with a nasty bite. Badgers and their setts are protected under law to stop humans interfering with them. You should keep a safe distance, downwind, wear dark colours and keep quiet if you wish to observe one. If you find an injured or trapped badger, call a wildlife rescue service immediately.

Foxes

The only British animal to have made a success of urban living, foxes are nevertheless at risk of injury from humans, commonly road accidents. Foxes should only be approached by experienced handlers as they can bite when cornered. Always observe from a distance before calling an animal rescue service. Foxes can contract sores and fur loss caused by skin mites. Those with advanced mange will need to be trapped and treated.