Just four islands form the world's second-largest archipelago show its spectacular diversity.

This is a feature from Issue 7 of Charitable Traveller. Click to read more from this issue.

Siargao

A tear-drop shaped island, Siargao is best known as the Philipines’ top surfing spot and dare devils from around the world flock to visit the island’s famous break – Cloud Nine. But you don’t have to chase waves to appreciate Siargao’s white sand islets, turquoise tide pools, winding rivers, and mangrove and palm tree-laden lagoons

Bohol

This tiny island has some quirky attractions, not least the Chocolate Hills (so-called because the grass that blankets them is brown in dry-season), so perfectly conical that they are reminiscent of Teletubbyland! The island is also home to the world’s smallest primate, the goggle-eyed tarsier which is about 10cm high and clings to tree branches.

Malapascua

This unassuming, idyllic island is a top dive site, offering the chance to see the psychedelic mandarin fish and the elusive thresher shark. These stealthy silver predators with huge mercury eyes and long tails usually live in darker depths but come closer to the surface here to be nibbled free of parasites by cleaner wrasse fish in a natural underwater salon.       

Palawan

This long finger of an island stretches towards Borneo and its unique flora and fauna is reflected in its geographic position. Palawan’s emerald waters, crystalline lagoons, and hidden coves are backed by soaring limestone cliffs which hide underground rivers and caves, while its Amazonian interior remains pristine.

Just four islands from the world's second-largest archipelago show its spectacular diversity.

This is a feature from Issue 7 of Charitable Traveller. Click to read more from this issue.

Siargao

A tear-drop shaped island, Siargao is best known as the Philipines’ top surfing spot and dare devils from around the world flock to visit the island’s famous break – Cloud Nine. But you don’t have to chase waves to appreciate Siargao’s white sand islets, turquoise tide pools, winding rivers, and mangrove and palm tree-laden lagoons

Bohol

This tiny island has some quirky attractions, not least the Chocolate Hills (so-called because the grass that blankets them is brown in dry-season), so perfectly conical that they are reminiscent of Teletubbyland! The island is also home to the world’s smallest primate, the goggle-eyed tarsier which is about 10cm high and clings to tree branches.

Malapascua

This unassuming, idyllic island is a top dive site, offering the chance to see the psychedelic mandarin fish and the elusive thresher shark. These stealthy silver predators with huge mercury eyes and long tails usually live in darker depths but come closer to the surface here to be nibbled free of parasites by cleaner wrasse fish in a natural underwater salon.  

Palawan

This long finger of an island stretches towards Borneo and its unique flora and fauna is reflected in its geographic position. Palawan’s emerald waters, crystalline lagoons, and hidden coves are backed by soaring limestone cliffs which hide underground rivers and caves, while its Amazonian interior remains pristine.

Just four islands from the world's second-largest archipelago show its spectacular diversity.

This is a feature from Issue 7 of Charitable Traveller. Click to read more from this issue.

Siargao

A tear-drop shaped island, Siragao is best known as the Phillippines’ top surfing spot. and dare devils from around the world flock to visit the island’s famous break – Cloud Nine. But you don’t have to chase waves to appreciate Siargao’s white sand islets, turquoise tide pools, winding rivers, and mangrove and palm tree-laden lagoon.

Bohol

This tiny island has some quirky attractions, not least the Chocolate Hills (so-called because the grass that blankets them is brown in dry-season), so perfectly conical that they are reminiscent of Teletubbyland! The island is also home to the world’s smallest primate, the goggle-eyed tarsier which is about 10cm high and clings to tree branches.

Malapascua

This unassuming, idyllic island is a top dive site, offering the chance to see the psychedelic mandarin fish and the elusive thresher shark. These stealthy silver predators with huge mercury eyes and long tails usually live in darker depths but come closer to the surface here to be nibbled free of parasites by cleaner wrasse fish in a natural underwater salon.

Palawan

This long finger of an island stretches towards Borneo and its unique flora and fauna is reflected in its geographic position. Palawan’s emerald waters, crystalline lagoons, and hidden coves are backed by soaring limestone cliffs which hide underground rivers and caves, while its Amazonian interior remains pristine.