If it’s not time to pack the suitcase but you’re yearning to travel, find inspiration on the box or in a book. Here are our recommendations… 

A Life on our Planet

Delayed by Covid-19 but more relevant than ever, David Attenborough’s seminal feature film is finally out in cinemas and on Netflix – part dire warning of climate change, part retrospective on his incredible 60-year career as Britain’s most famous naturalist. “I am David Attenborough and I’m 93. This is my witness statement,” he begins before showing us his experience of the earth’s beautiful diversity juxtaposed with the awful damage that humans have wrought on it. But, he says, “if we act now we can yet put it right,” so watch to the end. 

Michael Palin - Travels of a lifetime

Another travel legend takes to our screens this October for another retrospective on a well-travelled life. BBC 2 will air a series looking back at the Monty Python member’s other career as a travelling TV presenter. More details will be revealed soon but the four-episode series will see him reflect on how travel has evolved over time and the impact of globalisation. It will almost certainly be more funny than David Attenborough’s film and apparently has some surprise guest appearances. 

A Biologist Abroad

The author of this non-fiction book, Rory Putman, is a professional biologist with experience of working in the UK and overseas. He takes readers with him on working trips to Iceland, East Africa, Nigeria and Indonesia, introducing the countries, their people and their natural history, while explaining some of the wildlife issues which took him there in the first place. The understanding required to solve problems and seek solutions in conservation means you get quite a unique perspective on the countries he visits. 

Rogue Trip

It’s been on Disney Plus since the summer and it stars veteran U.S. correspondent and news anchor Bob Woodruff, who famously sustained a major brain injury from a bomb in Iraq, and his 28-year-old son, Mack. The pair visit ‘rogue’ places like Colombia and Pakistan and give a mostly positive picture of the destination behind the headlines. While the father and son formula is a bit tried and tested, it’s genuine here and what’s interesting is Bob’s die-hard quest for the story versus his son’s desire to capture everyday lives in his photography. 

A Life on our Planet

Delayed by Covid-19 but more relevant than ever, David Attenborough’s seminal feature film is finally out in cinemas and on Netflix – part dire warning of climate change, part retrospective on his incredible 60-year career as Britain’s most famous naturalist. “I am David Attenborough and I’m 93. This is my witness statement,” he begins before showing us his experience of the earth’s beautiful diversity juxtaposed with the awful damage that humans have wrought on it. But, he says, “if we act now we can yet put it right,” so watch to the end. 

Michael Palin - Travels of a lifetime

Another travel legend takes to our screens this October for another retrospective on a well-travelled life. BBC 2 will air a series looking back at the Monty Python member’s other career as a travelling TV presenter. More details will be revealed soon but the four-episode series will see him reflect on how travel has evolved over time and the impact of globalisation. It will almost certainly be more funny than David Attenborough’s film and apparently has some surprise guest appearances. 

A Biologist Abroad

The author of this non-fiction book, Rory Putman, is a professional biologist with experience of working in the UK and overseas. He takes readers with him on working trips to Iceland, East Africa, Nigeria and Indonesia, introducing the countries, their people and their natural history, while explaining some of the wildlife issues which took him there in the first place. The understanding required to solve problems and seek solutions in conservation means you get quite a unique perspective on the countries he visits. 

Rogue Trip

It’s been on Disney Plus since the summer and it stars veteran U.S. correspondent and news anchor Bob Woodruff, who famously sustained a major brain injury from a bomb in Iraq, and his 28-year-old son, Mack. The pair visit ‘rogue’ places like Colombia and Pakistan and give a mostly positive picture of the destination behind the headlines. While the father and son formula is a bit tried and tested, it’s genuine here and what’s interesting is Bob’s die-hard quest for the story versus his son’s desire to capture everyday lives in his photography.